Monday, October 31, 2016

UPDATE: Verification of Graduate Medical Education Training Form

The National Association Medical Staff Services (NAMSS), in partnership with the American Hospital Association, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and the Organization of Program Director Associations, released a new Verification of Graduate Medical Education Training Form in April 2016. This form, developed over the past several years, seeks to standardize the process for the verification of a practitioner’s internship, residency and fellowship experience in compliance with healthcare accreditation organizations’ standards. Over time, each hospital, managed care organization and other healthcare entities developed their own unique forms for obtaining verification of training. This created an inefficient system in which training programs received multiple variations on requests for the same information, slowing the credentialing and onboarding of practitioners and creating extra work for all involved. This new verification form eliminates these inefficiencies through standardization. Since its release, the form has already been downloaded over 6,000 times and is being implemented in hospitals and other healthcare organizations across the country.

The Verification of Graduate Medical Education Training Form is available for download HERE.


Monday, October 24, 2016

11 of Nation's Largest Payers Advocate for Expansion of Medicare Telemedicine

In a letter to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) last week, eleven of the nation's largest health insurance carriers offered to make available data on the value of telemedicine as Congress considers expanded coverage under Medicare for telemedicine services.The letter states, "We view telemedicine as an important tool in increasing consumer access to high quality, affordable healthcare, improving patient satisfaction and reducing costs," and, "We believe our experience in the commercial market can inform estimates of the impact of policy changes in Medicare."

For the full story from HealthLeaders Media, please click here. For the full text of the letter, please click here.

Monday, September 26, 2016

UPDATE: MSPs & the Standard Occupational Classification System

Please click here to access the comments submitted by NAMSS urging the inclusion of Medical Services Professionals (MSPs) in the 2018 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system. As previously reported in this blog, MSPs were not included as a new detailed occupational classification.


As MSPs play a unique, distinct and integral role in health care - leading the credentialing, privileging, and onboarding of medical staff applicants and thus serving as the gatekeepers of patient safety – NAMSS will continue to work toward recognition of the MSP profession in the SOC system. Again, we will provide additional updates as they become available.

Thursday, September 8, 2016

MSPs & the Standard Occupational Classification System

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released new updates to the 2018 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system in July. Medical Service Professionals (MSPs) were not included as a new occupational category, despite NAMSS' submission of official comments in 2014 urging their inclusion. BLS is accepting additional public comments before finalization and NAMSS will be submitting remarks advocating for recognition of MSPs as a detailed occupational category.  

According to the BLS website, the SOC system "is used by Federal statistical agencies to classify workers into occupational categories for the purpose of collecting, calculating, or disseminating data." Inclusion in this system increases recognition of a profession both in the public and private sectors, as well as allows for the generation of a wealth of information regarding the profession and those who practice it.

As MSPs play a unique, distinct and integral role in health care - leading the credentialing, privileging, and onboarding of medical staff applicants and thus serving as the gatekeepers of patient safety – NAMSS remains committed to working toward recognition of the MSP profession in the SOC system. We will provide further updates as they arise on this issue.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Celebrating 40 Years of NAMSS Conferences in Boston, September 17-21

As the NAMSS 40th Educational Conference & Exhibition quickly approaches, we are excited to highlight some new and fun features for attendees this year. To mark this important milestone, NAMSS is introducing a Memory Wall and a Where is NAMSS Wall where previous conferences will be remembered. These features will be interactive, allowing attendees to indicate which conferences they have attended, where they are from, and share in the memories of 40 successful events.

These are just some of the reasons to be excited about this year's conference in Boston. To learn more about all that this year's event and Bean Town have to offer through a short video and some helpful links, visit the NAMSS website by clicking here

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Becker's Hospital Review: Improving Credentialing

Becker's Hospital Review interviewed Scott Friesen, CEO of Newport Credentialing Solutions, and Jacqueline Lam, Director of Medical Staff Services at Winthrop University Hospital (Mineola, NY), about ways of improving and streamlining the credentialing process. Here are the 5 suggestions they offered:
  1. Utilize an enterprise-wide cloud-based technology platform
  2. Ensure data is accurate and current
  3. Understand the impact of delayed processing on revenue
  4. Streamline operations surrounding enterprise-wide technology
  5. Communication is key
For the full article and details on these 5 suggestions, please click here.

Monday, August 1, 2016

The "July Effect"

Every July, hospitals across the country welcome new medical graduates into their ranks. Many studies have been conducted to examine the so-called “July Effect,” the increase in negative outcomes and rates of medical errors for patients often attributed to this influx of inexperienced doctors. However, according to an article in Modern Healthcare, the “July Effect” may require further examination.

While some studies have found that there is an uptick in medical errors and patient morbidity in July, many doctors and hospitals are arguing that the “July Effect” may have little to do with recent medical graduates entering hospitals and staff turnover, and that the effect may vary by institution. One of the major studies on the “July Effect” posited: “Heterogeneity in the existing literature does not permit firm conclusions about the degree of risk posed, how changeover affects morbidity and rates of medical errors, or whether particular models are more or less problematic.”

Hospitals are staying vigilant, though. Through training programs for interns covering “everything from hand hygiene to advanced cardiac life support” and increased attention to quality and safety in orientations, hospitals are trying to combat the “July Effect,” whether real or perceived.


The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) created the Clinical Learning Environment Review program in 2012 to provide feedback to hospitals on patient safety and other areas. "What we are doing as an organization is driving change by providing that information and then coming back two years later to see what's changed," states Dr. Kevin Weiss, the ACGME's senior vice president for institutional accreditation.